Cozinha polonesa

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Cooking
t h e

POLISH
w a y

Copyright © 2002 by Lerner Publications Company All rights reserved. International copyright secured. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means—electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise—without the prior written permission of Lerner Publications Company, except for theinclusion of brief quotations in an acknowledged review. Lerner Publications Company A division of Lerner Publishing Group 241 First Avenue North Minneapolis, MN 55401 U.S.A. Website address: www.lernerbooks.com

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Zamojska-Hutchins, Danuta. Cooking the Polish way / by Danuta Zamojska-Hutchins.— Rev. & expanded. p. cm. — (Easy menu ethniccookbooks) Includes index. Summary: Introduces the land, culture, and cuisine of Poland and includes recipes for soups, salads, main dishes, and side dishes. Includes material on healthy, low-fat, vegetarian cooking, and holidays and festivals. eISBN: 0–8225–0540–1 1. Cookery, Polish—Juvenile literature. 2. Poland—Social life and customs—Juvenile literature. [1. Cookery, Polish. 2. Poland—Social life andcustoms.] I. Title. II. Series. TX723.5.P6 Z3 2002 641.59438—dc21 2001002962
Manufactured in the United States of America 1 2 3 4 5 6 – AM – 07 06 05 04 03 02

easy

menu

ethnic

cookbooks

Cooking
r e v i s e d a n d e x p a n d e d

t h e
t o i n c l u d e n e w l o w - f a t

POLISH
a n d v e g e t a r i a n r e c i p e s

w a y
Danuta Zamojska-Hutchins
a LernerPublications Company • Minneapolis

Contents

INTRODUCTION, 7

A POLISH TABLE, 27

The Land, 8 The Food, 9 The People, 11 Holidays and Festivals, 11
BEFORE YOU BEGIN, 19

A Polish Menu, 28
BREAKFAST AND SECOND BREAKFAST, 31

The Careful Cook, 20 Cooking Utensils, 21 Cooking Terms, 21 Special Ingredients, 22 Healthy and Low-Fat Cooking Tips, 24 Metric Conversions Chart, 25

Barley Soup, 32Mushrooms in Vinegar, 33 Hunter’s Stew, 34
DINNER, 37

Vegetable Salad, 38 Tomato and Onion Tier Salad, 39 Eggs Stuffed with Ham, 40

Piero˙ 42 zki, Rutabagas and Carrots, 44 Cauliflower with Polish Sauce, 47 Roast Stuffed Fish, 48
SUPPER, 51

HOLIDAY AND FESTIVAL FOOD, 61

Plum and Rhubarb Soup, 52 Cabbage Rolls, 54 Semi-Short Bread with Plums, 56 Vegetable Bouquet, 58

Christmas EveBorscht, 62 Herring Paste on Bread, 63 Noodles with Poppy Seeds, 64 Honey Cake, 67 Royal Mazurek, 68
INDEX, 70

Introduction

Polish people, whether living in Poland or in other parts of the world, have a fierce love for their country. They pride themselves on a strong national identity, something they have had to struggle to keep throughout their nation’s thousand-year history—a historythat has included numerous invasions and conquests by other coun­ tries. Food, though it has often been scarce in Poland, is neverthe­ less a very important part of Polish heritage and culture. Polish cook­ ing is rich, hearty, and varied in its many flavors and textures. Over hundreds of years, it has been influenced by a strong farming tradi­ tion, the available food resources (such as anabundance of fish and grains), and repeated contact with other cultures and cuisines. Preparing and eating food in Poland marks almost all social occa­ sions, particularly family get-togethers. Such gatherings may cele­ brate name days (days associated with certain Christian saints) or the church holidays that are a part of Poland’s long-standing Roman Catholic tradition, or they may be for no reasonother than to share each others’ company and conversation over a good meal.

Traditional Polish piero˙ ki, served steaming hot, can be enjoyed as appetizers or as part z of the main meal. (Recipe on page 42.)

7

Baltic Sea

RUSSIA
Gdansk

LITHUANIA

·
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st u Vi

GERM
8

R iver

BELARUS
Warsaw

ANY

POLAND

Kraków

·
TATRA MOUNTAINS

UKRAINE

CZECH REPUBLIC...
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