Digito

Disponível somente no TrabalhosFeitos
  • Páginas : 64 (15763 palavras )
  • Download(s) : 0
  • Publicado : 15 de junho de 2012
Ler documento completo
Amostra do texto
Business Ethics
The Law of Rules

Michael L. Michael
Senior Fellow, Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government
John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University

March 2006  ⎪  Working Paper No. 19

A Working Paper of the:
Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative

A Cooperative Project among:
The Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and GovernmentThe Center for Public Leadership
The Hauser Center for Nonprofit Organizations
The Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy

Citation

This paper may be cited as: Michael, Michael L. 2006. “Business Ethics: The Law of
Rules.” Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative Working Paper No. 19.   Cambridge,
MA: John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.  Comments may bedirected to the author.

A version of this paper is forthcoming in 16-4 Business Ethics Quarterly (Oct. 2006).

Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative

The  Corporate  Social  Responsibility  Initiative  at  the  Harvard  Kennedy  School  of
Government is a multi-disciplinary and multi-stakeholder program that seeks to study andenhance  the  public  contributions  of  private  enterprise.  It  explores  the  intersection  of
corporate responsibility, corporate governance and strategy, public policy, and the media.
It bridges theory and practice, builds leadership skills, and supports constructive dialogue
and collaboration among different sectors. It was founded in 2004 with the support of
Walter  H.  Shorenstein,  Chevron  Corporation,  The  Coca-Cola  Company,  and  General
Motors.The views expressed in this paper are those of the author and do not imply endorsement
by  the  Corporate  Social  Responsibility  Initiative,  the  John  F.  Kennedy  School  of
Government, or Harvard University.

For Further Information

Further information on the Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative can be obtainedfrom  the  Program  Coordinator,  Corporate  Social  Responsibility  Initiative,  Harvard
Kennedy School, 79 JFK Street, Mailbox 82, Cambridge, MA   02138, telephone (617)
495-1446, telefax (617) 496-5821, email CSRI@ksg.harvard.edu.

The  homepage  for  the  Corporate  Social  Responsibility  Initiative  can  be  found  at:
http://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/CSRI/

BUSINESS ETHICS: THE LAW OF RULES*

AbstractDespite the recent rash of corporate scandals and the resulting rush to address the problem by
adding more laws and regulations, seemingly little attention has been paid to how the nature (not
the substance) of rules may or may not affect ethical decision-making.   Drawing on work in the
law, ethics, management, psychology, and other social sciences, this article explores how severalcharacteristics of rules may interfere with the process of reaching and implementing ethical
decisions.  Such a relationship would have practical implications for regulatory policy and
managers of organizations, and the article concludes by suggesting how regulations and
corporate ethics programs should be able to improve the ethical culture of business and enhance
the ethical decision-making skills of employees.

##“One might suppose that where law is largely absent, behavior is pretty bad.  Yet it turns out to be
nearly the other way around.  The two areas where law is arguably the largest presence in ordinary
life – driving cars and paying taxes – are probably the two areas where there is the largest amount
of self-conscious cheating.”1

“NASA’s culture of bureaucratic accountability emphasized chain of command, procedure,following the rules, and going by the book.  While rules and procedures were essential for
coordination, they had an unintended but negative effect.  Allegiance to hierarchy and procedure
had replaced deference to NASA engineers’ technical expertise.”2

INTRODUCTION

Lower Manhattan, March 2, 2004:  Martha Stewart, WorldCom’s Scott Sullivan, Tyco's Dennis...
tracking img