Titulo

Disponível somente no TrabalhosFeitos
  • Páginas : 23 (5509 palavras )
  • Download(s) : 0
  • Publicado : 2 de dezembro de 2012
Ler documento completo
Amostra do texto
DRYWALL 
1. INTRODUCTION TO WARM AND DRYWALL 
This chapter describes the methodology used in EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM) to  estimate streamlined life‐cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors for drywall beginning at the  waste generation reference point. 1   The WARM GHG emission factors are used to compare the net emissions associated with drywall in the following three waste management alternatives: source  reduction, recycling and landfilling. Exhibit 1 shows the general outline of materials management  pathways for drywall in WARM.  For background information on the general purpose and function of  WARM emission factors, see the Introduction & Overview  chapter.  For more information on Source Reduction, Recycling and Landfilling, see the chapters devoted to those processes.  WARM also allows  users to calculate results in terms of energy, rather than GHGs.  The energy results are calculated using  the same methodology described here but with slight adjustments, as explained in the Energy Impacts   chapter. 
Exhibit 1: Life Cycle of Drywall in WARM 
Raw Material &  Intermediate Product  Acquisition, Processing, &  Transport (Virgin  Manufacture Only)Raw Material Acquisition,  Processing, & Transport  (Virgin Manufacture Only)

Transport to  Retail Facility

Drywall  Manufacture:  Recycling Offsets  Virgin Manufacture

19% of recycled  drywall to  closed loop  recycling

Transport to  Manufacturing or  Packaging Facility

81% of recycled  drywall to  open loop  recycling

Agric. Gypsum  Production:  Recycling Offsets  Virgin ManufactureTransport to  Farm

Product Use Product Use
WARM  Starts  Here

Drywall
Only Scrap from  Construction Sites

Recycling

Collection/Transport  to Recycling Facility

Recycled Drywall  Grinding & Paper  Screening

Composting

Not  Modeled
Life‐Cycle Stages That  Are GHG Sources  (Positive Emissions) Life‐Cycle Stages That  Result in Both  Positive and Negative  EmissionsSteps Not Included  in  WARM

Key
Landfilling
End‐of‐Life  Pathways  in WARM Not Modeled  for This  Material

All End of Life  Drywall

Landfilling

Extraction/Transport  to Landfill

Combustion

Not  Modeled

Only Installed  Drywall

End of Life

Recycling

Not  Modeled

  Drywall, also known as wallboard, gypsum board or plaster board, is manufactured from gypsum plaster and a paper covering.  Exhibit 2 presents the sources of drywall entering the waste stream. 



                                                            
EPA would like to thank Rik Master of USG Corporation for his efforts at improving these estimates. 

1   

Exhibit 2: Composition of the Drywall Waste Stream 
Source of Waste Drywall  New Construction  Demolition Manufacturing  Renovation  Source: CIWMB (2009b).    % of Total  64%  14%  12%  10% 

There are several different types of drywall products, including fire‐resistant types (generally  known as Type X drywall), water‐resistant types and others.  Additionally, drywall can be produced in a  range of thicknesses.  Our analysis examines the life‐cycle emissions of the most common type of drywall, half‐inch‐thick regular gypsum board.   Most drywall is currently disposed of in landfills (Master, 2009).  This disposal pathway can be  problematic; if water is admitted to the landfill, under certain conditions the drywall may produce  hydrogen sulfide gas.  Incineration can produce sulfur dioxide gas, and is banned in some states (CIWMB, 2009b).  Drywall is sometimes accepted at composting facilities, but it is used as an additive to  compost, rather than a true compost input (please see section 4.3).  For this reason, WARM does not  include a composting emission factor for drywall.  However, users interested in the GHG implications of  sending drywall to a composting facility can use the recycling factor as a proxy (again, see section 4.3).   ...
tracking img