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A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare is a publication of the Pennsylvania State
University. This Portable Document file is furnished free and without any charge of any kind.
Any person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own
risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim Manis, Faculty Editor, nor anyone associated with thePennsylvania State University assumes any responsibility for the material contained within the document or for the file as an electronic transmission, in any way.
A Midsummer Night’s by William Shakespeare, the Pennsylvania State University, Electronic Classics Series, Jim Manis, Faculty Editor, Hazleton, PA 18201-1291 is a Portable Document File produced as part of an ongoing student publicationproject to bring classical works of literature, in
English, to free and easy access of those wishing to make use of them.
Cover Design: Jim Manis
Copyright © 1999 The Pennsylvania State University

The Pennsylvania State University is an equal opportunity university.

STARVELING: a tailor.

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S
DREAM

HIPPOLYTA: queen of the Amazons, betrothed to
Theseus.

WilliamShakespeare

HERMIA: daughter to Egeus, in love with Lysander.

(written about 1593-1594)

HELENA: in love with Demetrius.

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

OBERON: king of the fairies.
THESEUS: Duke of Athens.
TITANIA: queen of the fairies.
EGEUS: father to Hermia.
PUCK: or Robin Goodfellow.
LYSANDER and DEMETRIUS: in love with Hermia.
PEASEBLOSSOM, COBWEB, MOTH, MUSTARDSEED:
fairies.PHILOSTRATE: master of the revels to Theseus.
QUINCE: a carpenter.

Other fairies attending their King and Queen.
Attendants on Theseus and Hippolyta.

SNUG: a joiner.
SCENE: Athens, and a wood near it.
BOTTOM: a weaver.
FLUTE: a bellows-mender.
SNOUT: a tinker.
3

A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act I, scene i
Stir up the Athenian youth to merriments;
Awake the pert and nimble spirit of mirth;Turn melancholy forth to funerals;
The pale companion is not for our pomp.

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S
DREAM

[Exit PHILOSTRATE.]

ACT I

Hippolyta, I woo’d thee with my sword,
And won thy love, doing thee injuries;
But I will wed thee in another key,
With pomp, with triumph and with revelling.

SCENE I: Athens. The palace of THESEUS.
[Enter THESEUS, HIPPOLYTA, PHILOSTRATE, andAttendants.]
THESEUS: Now, fair Hippolyta, our nuptial hour
Draws on apace; four happy days bring in
Another moon: but, O, methinks, how slow
This old moon wanes! she lingers my desires,
Like to a step-dame or a dowager
Long withering out a young man revenue.

[Enter EGEUS, HERMIA, LYSANDER, and DEMETRIUS.]
EGEUS: Happy be Theseus, our renowned duke!
THESEUS: Thanks, good Egeus: what’s the newswith thee?
EGEUS: Full of vexation come I, with complaint
Against my child, my daughter Hermia.
Stand forth, Demetrius. My noble lord,
This man hath my consent to marry her.
Stand forth, Lysander: and my gracious duke,
This man hath bewitch’d the bosom of my child;
Thou, thou, Lysander, thou hast given her rhymes,
And interchanged love-tokens with my child:
Thou hast by moonlight at herwindow sung,

HIPPOLYTA: Four days will quickly steep themselves in
night;
Four nights will quickly dream away the time;
And then the moon, like to a silver bow
New-bent in heaven, shall behold the night
Of our solemnities.
THESEUS:

Go, Philostrate,
4

A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act I, scene i
But in this kind, wanting your father’s voice,
The other must be held the worthier.With feigning voice verses of feigning love,
And stolen the impression of her fantasy
With bracelets of thy hair, rings, gawds, conceits,
Knacks, trifles, nosegays, sweetmeats, messengers
Of strong prevailment in unharden’d youth:
With cunning hast thou filch’d my daughter’s heart,
Turn’d her obedience, which is due to me,
To stubborn harshness: and, my gracious duke,
Be it so she; will not...
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