Acordes de violino

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These are fiddle chord charts for the chords most commonly used in Old Time, Irish, Scottish and other “folk” styles of fiddling. Full chords are composed of three notes: the root note, the 3rd (“flatted” 3rd for minor chords) and the 5th harmony notes. On a fiddle, one can only play partial chords, composed of any 2-note combination of the root, 3rd or flatted 3rd or the 5th. Owing to the way afiddle is played (with a bow), the notes must be on adjacent strings. Bluegrass fiddlers make extensive use of chords (usually called “double-stops”) when not playing a solo. In Old Time, Irish and Scottish playing, chords are used primarily by a second fiddler. A good second fiddler will often mix chordal accompaniment with playing the main melody in unison, the main melody an octave lower(especially when playing a baritone/octave fiddle) or a harmony melody. Different regional styles will emphasize different techniques for the second fiddler; for example, in certain regions of Ireland, simply playing the tune in various combinations of unison and an octave lower is favored. In other styles, the second fiddler plays primarily chords; which works particularly well with a baritone fiddle.A viola is sometimes used as well for the same purpose. In any case, any fiddler who ever intends to play second fiddle in a duet best know his or her chords. The bowing techniques for chord playing include long bowing and the “chop” (used extensively by Darol Anger—he has a lesson on the chop on YouTube). Experienced players will use various other techniques such as the burl (called a treble inIrish playing), various shuffle patterns and so forth. We intend to create a video lesson on bowing methods for second fiddle in the near future. How to read the charts: The first note (bolded) is the chord name. The three notes in parentheses are the root note, the 3rd harmony and the 5th harmony. For example C (C E G) indicates that for a C chord, the root is C, the 3rd is E and the 5th is G. Inthe tables that follow, each row corresponds to a string on the fiddle. The heavy darkened column (i.e. second column) represents the fiddle nut and the vertical lines represent imaginary frets. The first column (to the left of the “nut”) represents the open (unstopped) strings. These tables are for a fiddle tuned in the standard violin E-A-D-G tuning. We will have additional charts available forvarious “cross-tunings”, such as E-A-E-A, D-G-D-G, E-A-D-A, etc. When learning a new tune, try various 2-note combinations on adjacent strings to get the “voicing” you are looking for. Most of the chords can be played in either first or third positions. Chords composed of notes in the first position are the easiest. In general, chords composed of 2 notes that are literally adjacent to on anothertake some practice to play in tune.

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C (C E G)
E A D G 0 Open String F Bb Eb Ab F# B E A G C F Bb Ab C# F# B A D G C Bb Eb Ab C# B E A D C F Bb Eb C# F# B E D G C F Eb Ab C# F# E A D G

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Cm (C Eb G)
E A D G 0 Open String F Bb Eb Ab F# B E A G C F Bb Ab C# F# B A D G C Bb Eb Ab C# B E A D C F Bb Eb C# F# B E D G C FEb Ab C# F# E A D G

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G (G B D)
E A D G 0 Open String F Bb Eb Ab F# B E A G C F Bb Ab C# F# B A D G C Bb Eb Ab C# B E A D C F Bb Eb C# F# B E D G C F Eb Ab C# F# E A D G

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Gm (G Bb D)
E A D G 0 Open String F Bb Eb Ab F# B E A G C F Bb Ab C# F# B A D G C Bb Eb Ab C# B EA D C F Bb Eb C# F# B E D G C F Eb Ab C# F# E A D G

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D (D F# A)
E A D G 0 Open String F Bb Eb Ab F# B E A G C F Bb Ab C# F# B A D G C Bb Eb Ab C# B E A D C F Bb Eb C# F# B E D G C F Eb Ab C# F# E A D G

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Dm (D F A)
E A D G 0 Open String F Bb Eb Ab F# B E A G C F Bb...
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